Pottery - Casa Grande Monument and Heard Museum

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Early Classic Period (AD 1150-1300) Casa Grande Red-on-buff Jar. During pre-Classic periods, red-on-cuff vessels were made in a variety of forms including bowls, jars, and dippers. Casa Grande Red-on-buff vessels were exclusively jars.
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This petroglyph cast shows a Desert Bighorn Sheep.
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This petroglyph cast shows a Desert Bighorn Sheep.
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Pre-Classic period Carved bowl or censer.
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Late-Classic Gila Polychrome bowl. Casa Grande Ruins' Hohokam may have acquired it form the Tonto Basin or used the Salado Polychrome style on a locally made bowl.
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Late-Classic Gila Polychrome bowl. Casa Grande Ruins' Hohokam may have acquired it form the Tonto Basin or used the Salado Polychrome style on a locally made bowl.
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Late-Classic Gila Polychrome bowl. Casa Grande Ruins' Hohokam may have acquired it form the Tonto Basin or used the Salado Polychrome style on a locally made bowl.
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Human figurine: Paint on the figurine face suggests that the Hohokam may have painted or tattooed their bodies and faces.
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An artist's conception of Pre-Classic period Hohokam dancers. The decorative feather headdresses, necklaces, and costumes are based on pottery designs, clay figurines, and petroglyphs.
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Early Classic Casa Grande red-on-buff jar
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Early Classic Casa Grande red-on-buff jar
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Late Classic plainware jar and jar sherds. The dimples are a possible reference to the prickly pods of datura, or jimson weed, a plant with narcotic properties that might have held medicinal or spiritual power for the Hohokam.
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Late Classic plainware jar and jar sherds. The dimples are a possible reference to the prickly pods of datura, or jimson weed, a plant with narcotic properties that might have held medicinal or spiritual power for the Hohokam.
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Basket. The Hohokam made baskets for gathering and transporting harvested palnts form the fields and also for processing, storking, and serving foods. Yucca, cattail, and beargrass were the primary resources for basket making.
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Classic Period (AD 1150-1400) Red-on-buff pottery continued to be made in the Early Classic period (AD 1150-1300). Vessel forms were restricted to jars and handled pitchers. Decoration was simpler with an almost complete loss of life forms and repeated elements. By the Late Classic Period (AD 1300-1400) decorated pottery was replaced with slipped and highly polished red wares. The interiors were sometimes smudged; polishing striations and fire clouds were patterned. Salado Polychrome ceramics, representing a clear break with previous ceramic traditions, appeared. They may have been traded to the Hohokam or locally made.
9, 10 Early Classic period Casa Grande Red-on-buff jars
11, 12 Late Classic period Gila Red
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Classic Period (AD 1150-1400) Red-on-buff pottery continued to be made in the Early Classic period (AD 1150-1300). Vessel forms were restricted to jars and handled pitchers. Decoration was simpler with an almost complete loss of life forms and repeated elements. By the Late Classic Period (AD 1300-1400) decorated pottery was replaced with slipped and highly polished red wares. The interiors were sometimes smudged; polishing striations and fire clouds were patterned. Salado Polychrome ceramics, representing a clear break with previous ceramic traditions, appeared. They may have been traded to the Hohokam or locally made.
9, 10 Early Classic period Casa Grande Red-on-buff jars
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Classic Period (AD 1150-1400) Red-on-buff pottery continued to be made in the Early Classic period (AD 1150-1300). Vessel forms were restricted to jars and handled pitchers. Decoration was simpler with an almost complete loss of life forms and repeated elements. By the Late Classic Period (AD 1300-1400) decorated pottery was replaced with slipped and highly polished red wares. The interiors were sometimes smudged; polishing striations and fire clouds were patterned. Salado Polychrome ceramics, representing a clear break with previous ceramic traditions, appeared. They may have been traded to the Hohokam or locally made.
9, 10 Early Classic period Casa Grande Red-on-buff jars
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Classic Period (AD 1150-1400) Red-on-buff pottery continued to be made in the Early Classic period (AD 1150-1300). Vessel forms were restricted to jars and handled pitchers. Decoration was simpler with an almost complete loss of life forms and repeated elements. By the Late Classic Period (AD 1300-1400) decorated pottery was replaced with slipped and highly polished red wares. The interiors were sometimes smudged; polishing striations and fire clouds were patterned. Salado Polychrome ceramics, representing a clear break with previous ceramic traditions, appeared. They may have been traded to the Hohokam or locally made.
11, 12 Late Classic period Gila Red
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Sedentary Period (AD 975 - 1150) During the Sedentary period, the greatest variety of vessel forms were produced. Vessel wall thickness increased, and the trend toward delicate artistry was reversed. Designs were bold and undisciplined. It appears that quality gave way to quantity. Some archeologists suggest that pottery was mass produced. Regional variation in pottery became pronounced at this time. Hohokam groups in the Tucson Basin manufactured red-on-brown pottery, a trend that continued throughout the remainder of the Hohokam sequence. By the end of the Sedentary period, red wares had reappeared in both the Tucson and Phoenix basins.
7, 8 Sedentary period Sacaton Red-on-buff vessels from the Phoenix Basin.
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Colonial Period (AD 775-975) The most prevalent vessel forms were the flared bowl and straight-sided jars. Incising ceased as a decorative technique when painted decoration reached its artistic pinnacle, AD 850-975. Designs were intricate, tightly packed, and skilfully executed. Hatches were replaced with solid lines, and there was increased use of curvilinear scrolls, small design elements, and animal and human life forms.
4, 5, 6 Colonial period Santa Cruz Red-on-buff vessels mad in the Phoenix Basin.
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Colonial Period (AD 775-975) The most prevalent vessel forms were the flared bowl and straight-sided jars. Incising ceased as a decorative technique when painted decoration reached its artistic pinnacle, AD 850-975. Designs were intricate, tightly packed, and skilfully executed. Hatches were replaced with solid lines, and there was increased use of curvilinear scrolls, small design elements, and animal and human life forms.
4, 5, 6 Colonial period Santa Cruz Red-on-buff vessels mad in the Phoenix Basin.
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Pioneer Period (AD 300 - 775) The earliest Hohokam Pottery included a plain buff/ brown and a polished red ware. Decorated pottery, with red designs of chevrons and spirals painted on a gray background, appeared around AD 500. Incising of bowl interiors also occurred. Eventually, potters were able to produce buff-colored backgrounds. Refinement in decorating is reflected by the fine red line work, covering the entire vessel.
1, 2, 3 Gila Plain vessels. Gila Plain first appeared during the Pioneer period and was made through the Classic period, a span of a thousand years.
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Pioneer Period (AD 300 - 775) The earliest Hohokam Pottery included a plain buff/ brown and a polished red ware. Decorated pottery, with red designs of chevrons and spirals painted on a gray background, appeared around AD 500. Incising of bowl interiors also occurred. Eventually, potters were able to produce buff-colored backgrounds. Refinement in decorating is reflected by the fine red line work, covering the entire vessel.
1, 2, 3 Gila Plain vessels. Gila Plain first appeared during the Pioneer period and was made through the Classic period, a span of a thousand years.
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Colonial Period (AD 775-975) The most prevalent vessel forms were the flared bowl and straight-sided jars. Incising ceased as a decorative technique when painted decoration reached its artistic pinnacle, AD 850-975. Designs were intricate, tightly packed, and skilfully executed. Hatches were replaced with solid lines, and there was increased use of curvilinear scrolls, small design elements, and animal and human life forms.
4, 5, 6 Colonial period Santa Cruz Red-on-buff vessels mad in the Phoenix Basin.
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Tucson Polychrome jar fragment. Tucson Basin, Hohokam
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Tucson Polychrome jar fragment. Tucson Basin, Hohokam
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Gila Polychrome fragment. Tonto Basin, Salado.
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Trade items found at Casa Grande Ruins.
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Deadmans Black-on-red pitcher. Ancestral Pueblo.
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Awatovi Black-on-yellow bowl fragment. Hopi Mesas.
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Potsherds. Whole ceramic vessels are rare in archeological sites. Potsherds, the fragmentary remains of vessels, provide a wealth of information to archeologists. Designs on sherds can be used to date sites. The vessel part, such as the rim, body, or base, and vessel type, such as a bowl, jar, or plate, can be determined by studying potsherds. Temper often determines if the pottery was made locally or traded.
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Potsherds. Whole ceramic vessels are rare in archeological sites. Potsherds, the fragmentary remains of vessels, provide a wealth of information to archeologists. Designs on sherds can be used to date sites. The vessel part, such as the rim, body, or base, and vessel type, such as a bowl, jar, or plate, can be determined by studying potsherds. Temper often determines if the pottery was made locally or traded.
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Olla. Large pottery vessels were used for water and food storage and saguaro wine cooking. When different types of temper were added, a vessel became more porous and acted as an evaporative cooler, producing chilled water. This olla was found near the Great House.
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Olla. Large pottery vessels were used for water and food storage and saguaro wine cooking. When different types of temper were added, a vessel became more porous and acted as an evaporative cooler, producing chilled water. This olla was found near the Great House.
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These pottery designs indicate the importance of animals in Hohokam life. Pictured on these ceramic framents are quail, lizards, and deer.
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Early Classic Period (AD 1150-1300) Casa Grande Red-on-buff Jar. During pre-Classic periods, red-on-cuff vessels were made in a variety of forms including bowls, jars, and dippers. Casa Grande Red-on-buff vessels were exclusively jars.
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Late Classic Period (AD 1300-1400) Red ware Jar. Red ware pottery was the dominant ceramic during the Late Classic period. Polishing striations are visible on the jar's surface. The dark smudges around the jar, called "fire clouds," result from uneven heating during the firing process.
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Late Classic Period (AD 1300-1400) Red ware Jar. Red ware pottery was the dominant ceramic during the Late Classic period. Polishing striations are visible on the jar's surface. The dark smudges around the jar, called "fire clouds," result from uneven heating during the firing process.
Early Classic Period (AD 1150-1300) Casa Grande Red-on-buff Jar. During pre-Classic periods, red-on-cuff vessels were made in a variety of forms including bowls, jars, and dippers. Casa Grande Red-on-buff vessels were exclusively jars.
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1 Western Ancestral Pueblo. Tusayan Black-on-red Jar. AD 1005-1150
This bird-wing motif was used frequently at the time this jar was painted, but the jar's shape is rare.
3 Nampeto (1862-1942 & Fannie Nampeyo (1900-2000). Hopi-Tewa. Jar 1930s.
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1 Western Ancestral Pueblo. Tusayan Black-on-red Jar. AD 1005-1150
This bird-wing motif was used frequently at the time this jar was painted, but the jar's shape is rare.
2 Camille Quotskuyva (b. 1964) Hopi-Tewa. Jar 1991.
Like other innovative potters, Camille Quotskuyva, Nampeyo's great-great-granddaughter, created her own version of the bird-wing motif.
3 Nampeto (1862-1942 & Fannie Nampeyo (1900-2000). Hopi-Tewa. Jar 1930s.
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2 Camille Quotskuyva (b. 1964) Hopi-Tewa. Jar 1991.
Like other innovative potters, Camille Quotskuyva, Nampeyo's great-great-granddaughter, created her own version of the bird-wing motif.
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1 Ancestral Pueblo. Gallup Black-on-white Pitcher. AD 1050-1100.
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4 Ancestral Pueblo. Tularosa Black-on-white Pitcher. AD 1100-1250.
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4 Ancestral Pueblo. Tularosa Black-on-white Pitcher. AD 1100-1250.
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4 Ancestral Pueblo. San Lazaro Glaze Polychrome Jar. AD 1490-1550
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4 Ancestral Pueblo. San Lazaro Glaze Polychrome Jar. AD 1490-1550
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Tony Jojola (b.1958), Isleta and Rosemary lonewolf (b. 1953), Santa Clara Tewa. "Indigenous Evolution," 2004 This art fence references the land of the South-west and the organic fences built by Native people from materials such as adobe, ocotillo or saguaro cactus. The fence harmonizes colors of the Southwest in clay and glass. The fence begins with darker colors, and then continues with brighter colors representing land and sky.
"The fence speaks to the endurance of our culture. It's about going through boundaries, it symbolizes our persistent existence.'" Tony Jojola.
"This linear installation reminds visitors to leave stereotyped preconceptions behind and enter a world where indigenous people blend the past with the present and firmly establish a limitless future." Rosemary Lonewolf.
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3 Ancestral Pueblo. Snowflake Black-on-white Bowl. AD 1100-1200.
4 Hohokam. Santa Cruz Red-on-buff Plate. AD 900-1150.
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4 Hohokam. Santa Cruz Red-on-buff Plate. AD 900-1150.
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3 Ancestral Pueblo. Snowflake Black-on-white Bowl. AD 1100-1200.
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3 Ancestral Pueblo. Snowflake Black-on-white Bowl. AD 1100-1200.
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4 Hohokam. Santa Cruz Red-on-buff Plate. AD 900-1150.
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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Arroh-ah-och. Laguna Pueblo, 1830 or 1840-c. 1900.
Jar, 1880-1890
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Arroh-ah-och. Laguna Pueblo, 1830 or 1840-c. 1900.
Jar, 1880-1890
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Arroh-ah-och. Laguna Pueblo, 1830 or 1840-c. 1900.
Jar, 1880-1890
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Arroh-ah-och. Laguna Pueblo, 1830 or 1840-c. 1900.
Jar, 1880-1890
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Arroh-ah-och. Laguna Pueblo, 1830 or 1840-c. 1900.
Jar, 1880-1890
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Cochiti Pueblo. Kiua polychrome jar, 1860's.
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Acoma Pueblo. Ako Polychrome Jar. 1750-1760.
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pictorial Jar, c. 1900
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Yokuts/Mono. Basket, 1890-1900. Epicampes grass, redbud bark, bracken fern.
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Yokuts/Mono. Basket, 1890-1900. Epicampes grass, redbud bark, bracken fern.
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Shasta. Basket with lid, late 1800s. Willow, pine root, tule root, beargrass, maidenhair fern.
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Shasta. Basket with lid, late 1800s. Willow, pine root, tule root, beargrass, maidenhair fern.
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Shasta. Basket with lid, late 1800s. Willow, pine root, tule root, beargrass, maidenhair fern.
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Shasta. Basket with lid, late 1800s. Willow, pine root, tule root, beargrass, maidenhair fern.
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Shasta. Basket with lid, late 1800s. Willow, pine root, tule root, beargrass, maidenhair fern.
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Yokuts. Gambling tray, c. 1900. Sedge root, redbud, dyed bracken root, deer grass.
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Yokuts. Gambling tray, c. 1900. Sedge root, redbud, dyed bracken root, deer grass.
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Western Apache. Pictorial basketry tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Yawapai. Pictorial tray with camels, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Yawapai. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial tray with Ga'an dancers, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia, yucca root.
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Yawapai. Pictorial tray with camels, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial basketry tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray with Ga'an dancers, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia, yucca root.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Yawapai. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Yawapai. Pictorial tray with camels, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial basketry tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray with Ga'an dancers, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia, yucca root.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Yawapai. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Yawapai. Pictorial tray with camels, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial basketry tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray with Ga'an dancers, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia, yucca root.
Western Apache. Pictorial tray, c. 1900s. Willow, martynia.
Yawapai. Pictorial tray, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Nampeyo. Tewa/Hopi, 1860-1942. Jar, 1906.
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Nampeyo. Tewa/Hopi, 1860-1942. Jar, 1906.
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Nampeyo. Tewa/Hopi, 1860-1942. Jar, 1906.
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Zuni c. 1830-1900.
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Zuni Pueblo. Kiapkwa polychrome jar, 1830-1840.
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Zuni Pueblo. Kiapkwa polychrome jar, 1830-1840.
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Zuni Pueblo. Kiapkwa polychrome jar, 1830-1840.
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Zuni Pueblo. Bowl, c. 1850.
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Zuni Pueblo. Bowl, c. 1850.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1900.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1900.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1900.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1900.
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Cochiti Pueblo. Kiua polychrome storage jar, 1800-1850.
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Cochiti Pueblo. Kiua polychrome storage jar, 1800-1850.
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Cochiti Pueblo. Kiua polychrome storage jar, 1800-1850.
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Nancy Youngblood, Santa Clara Pueblo, b. 1955. Melon Bowls, 1998-2001.
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Sara Fina Tafoya, Santa Clara Pueblo, c. 1863-1950. Jar, 1890-1920.
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Sara Fina Tafoya, Santa Clara Pueblo, c. 1863-1950. Jar, 1890-1920.
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Maria Martinez (1887-1980) and Julian Martinez (1885-1943), San Ildefonso Pueblo. Jar, 1923-1925.
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Maria Martinez (1887-1980) and Julian Martinez (1885-1943), San Ildefonso Pueblo. Black-on-red Jar, c. 1925.
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Maria Martinez (1887-1980) and Julian Martinez (1885-1943), San Ildefonso Pueblo. Black-on-red Jar, c. 1925.
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Western Apache. Pictorial basket, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial basket, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial basket, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial basket, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Western Apache. Pictorial basket, early 1900s. Willow, martynia.
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Chemehuevi. Pictorial basket, 1920s-1930s. Willow, martynia, juncus rush.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1890.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1890.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1890.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1890.
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Zuni Pueblo. Jar, c. 1890.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Zuni Pueblo. Storage Jar, 1920s.
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Maria Martinez (1887-1980) and Julian Martinez (1885-1943), San Ildefonso Pueblo. Polychrome Jar with Hopi Katsina sun face, c. 1925.
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Maria Martinez (1887-1980) and Julian Martinez (1885-1943), San Ildefonso Pueblo. Polychrome Jar with Hopi Katsina sun face, c. 1925.
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Maria Martinez (1887-1980) and Julian Martinez (1885-1943), San Ildefonso Pueblo. Polychrome Jar with Hopi Katsina sun face, c. 1925.
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20 Apache. Basket, late 1800s. Early baskets such as these could have been used for food service. A basket very similar to this one is seen in a photograph from the 1880s and identified by the photographer as Chiricahua Apache.
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1 Western Apache. Basket, early 1900s.
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1 Western Apache. Basket, early 1900s.
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2 Akimel O'otham. Basket, 1920-1940. The Man in the Maze design is an important image used in art both for Tohono O'odham and Akimel O'otham. The figure is I'itoi, Elder Brother, who created the People, and the Maze is his house.
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9 Akimel O'otham. Basket, 1920-1940.
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11, 12 Akimel O'otham. Basket, 1920-1940.
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5, 6 Akimel O'otham. Basket, 1920s-1940s.
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8 Akimel O'otham. Basket, c. 1900.
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Akimel O'otham. Miniature Baskets, 1900s-1940s.
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Akimel O'otham. Miniature Baskets, 1900s-1940s.
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Akimel O'otham. Miniature Baskets, 1900s-1940s.
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18 Akimel O'otham. Basket, 1920-1940.
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3 Akimel O'otham. Basket, 1900-1925. This design is a five petaled squash blossom.
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3 Akimel O'otham. Basket, 1900-1925. This design is a five petaled squash blossom.
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4, 5 Akimel O'otham. Basket, c. 1900. Left Basket: This design is a four petaled squash blossom.
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1 Salado. Jar, AD 1350-1450. The Salado were not necessarily a separate people from the Hohokam, and made pottery idnetified by three type, including Tonto Polychrome, of which this jar is an example.
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2 Salado. Parrot effigy jar, AD 1100-1450. In precontact times, parrots and parrot feathers were part of the trade between Mexico and the Southwest. Many Salado sites were in the Roosevelt Dam area and were unondated by the waters from Roosevelt Lake begining in 1909.
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2 Salado. Parrot effigy jar, AD 1100-1450. In precontact times, parrots and parrot feathers were part of the trade between Mexico and the Southwest. Many Salado sites were in the Roosevelt Dam area and were unondated by the waters from Roosevelt Lake begining in 1909.
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2 Salado. Parrot effigy jar, AD 1100-1450. In precontact times, parrots and parrot feathers were part of the trade between Mexico and the Southwest. Many Salado sites were in the Roosevelt Dam area and were unondated by the waters from Roosevelt Lake begining in 1909.
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4 Salado. Dog figurative jar, AD 1150-1250. This jar resembles ceramics from the Casas Grandes area of Mexico.
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4 Salado. Dog figurative jar, AD 1150-1250. This jar resembles ceramics from the Casas Grandes area of Mexico.
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6 Salado. Gila polychrome jar, AD 1300-1450. The design element of the feathered serpent is part of a pan-Southwestern belief system found after AD 1350.
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26 Salado. Textile fragment, AD 1200-1450. This belt is made by finger-weaving finely spun cotton. Entire shirts were made with these intricate open-work techniques.
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26 Salado. Textile fragment, AD 1200-1450. This belt is made by finger-weaving finely spun cotton. Entire shirts were made with these intricate open-work techniques.
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Hohokam. Rectangular bowl, AD 900-1150. This large bowl was made during a period when the Hohokam lived in villages with large dwellings and plazas. Hohokam architecture, pottery and stone tools are found as far north as Flastaff, Arizona.
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Hohokam. Rectangular bowl, AD 900-1150. This large bowl was made during a period when the Hohokam lived in villages with large dwellings and plazas. Hohokam architecture, pottery and stone tools are found as far north as Flastaff, Arizona.
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Hohokam. Rectangular bowl, AD 900-1150. This large bowl was made during a period when the Hohokam lived in villages with large dwellings and plazas. Hohokam architecture, pottery and stone tools are found as far north as Flastaff, Arizona.
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Hohokam. Rectangular bowl, AD 900-1150. This large bowl was made during a period when the Hohokam lived in villages with large dwellings and plazas. Hohokam architecture, pottery and stone tools are found as far north as Flastaff, Arizona.
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21 Hohokam. Bowl, AD 750-900.
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22 Hohokam. Human figurative jar, AD 300-900.
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22 Hohokam. Human figurative jar, AD 300-900.
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22 Hohokam. Human figurative jar, AD 300-900.
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23 Hohokam. Human figurines, AD 900-1150.
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11 Hohokam. Plate, AD 750-1150.
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12 Hohokam. Gourd-shaped pot, AD 900-1150.
13 Hohokam. Jar, AD 900-1100.
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14 Hohokam. Jar, AD 900-1150.
15 Hohokam. Censer, AD 900-1150.
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16 Hohokam. Bowl, AD 300-750.
17 Hohokam. Bowl, AD 750-1150.
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18 Hohokam. Scoop, AD 750-1150.
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7 Hohokam. Jar, AD 1150-1450.
8 Hohokam. Jar, AD 1150-1450.
9 Hohokam. StorageJar, AD 1150-1300.
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7 Hohokam. Jar, AD 1150-1450.
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8 Hohokam. Jar, AD 1150-1450.
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8 Hohokam. Jar, AD 1150-1450.
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8 Hohokam. Jar, AD 1150-1450.
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9 Hohokam. StorageJar, AD 1150-1300.
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10 Hohokam. Jar, AD 900-1150.
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2 Maricopa Vase, 1880-1915. "The bull's eye design (circle with a dot) is a good luck sign. Water is represented by lines around the circle; these are old designs." Dorothea Sunn-Avery, Pre-Posh
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5 Maricopa. Bowl with frogs, early 1900s.
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Maricopa. Jar with male and female images, early 1900s.
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Maricopa. Jar with male and female images, early 1900s.
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3 Paiute. Wedding basket, c. 1900. Paiute people wove many of these baskets for sale to the Navajo, who ordered them for ceremonies.
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2 Paiute. Burden Basket, early 1900s. The Southern Paiute people gathered the seeds of at least 44 species of grass.
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2 Paiute. Burden Basket, early 1900s. The Southern Paiute people gathered the seeds of at least 44 species of grass.
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16 Navajo. Basket, c 1900.
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17 Navajo. Water bottle, c. 1900.
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18 Navajo. Basket, c. 1900.
This basket design is often called the wedding basket because the baste is used in weddings, but it also is used in other ceremonies. The designs on this basket represent the landscape. The exterior edge represents daylight, while the dark triangles immediately below represent night. The red band is a rainbow. Inside the band the dark triangles represent rain clouds, and the light central areas is mountains and land. The center point is the beginning of life and the source of rain, and the break in the design is the pathway of consciousness.
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19 Navajo. Baskets, c. 1900.
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19 Navajo. Baskets, c. 1900.
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9 Hopi. Jar, c. 1900. Eagle Katsinas and Pahlhikmana are depited on this jar, which was featured on a United States postage stamp, Pueblo Art series, April 13, 1977.
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5 Hopi. Canteen, 1890-1900.
6 Hopi. Canteen, late-1800s.
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5 Hopi. Canteen, 1890-1900.
6 Hopi. Canteen, late-1800s.
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5 Hopi. Canteen, 1890-1900.
6 Hopi. Canteen, late-1800s.
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2 Hopi. Jar, 1905-1910. Potter Mark Tahbo commented on the unusual design below the rim on this jar. Instead of featuring abstract bird feathers or beaks, the entire bird is depicted.
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2 Hopi. Jar, 1905-1910. Potter Mark Tahbo commented on the unusual design below the rim on this jar. Instead of featuring abstract bird feathers or beaks, the entire bird is depicted.
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19 Hopi. Ladle, c. 1900.
20 Hopi. Ladle, early 1900s. According to advisor Karen Kahe, ??? this would have been used as a dipper for stew.
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20 Hopi. Ladle, early 1900s. According to advisor Karen Kahe, ??? this would have been used as a dipper for stew.
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19 Hopi. Ladle, c. 1900.
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19 Hopi. Ladle, c. 1900.
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13 Emma Adams, Hopi. Piki batter bowl, early 1900s. Marcella Kahhe identified this as the work of her mother.
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13 Emma Adams, Hopi. Piki batter bowl, early 1900s. Marcella Kahhe identified this as the work of her mother.
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6 Hopi. Polacca polychrome bowl, late 1800s.
7 Dextra Quotskuyva (b 1928), Hopi-Tewa. Jar, 1976.
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8 Hopi., Canteen, 1880-1910.
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9 Kampeyo (1862-1942), Hopi-Tewa. Jar, early 1900s.
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9 Kampeyo (1862-1942), Hopi-Tewa. Jar, early 1900s.
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2 Hopi. Canteen, late 1800s. Water serpents flank a turtle on this water carrier collected at Polacca, Arizona.
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2 Hopi. Canteen, late 1800s. Water serpents flank a turtle on this water carrier collected at Polacca, Arizona.
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2 Hopi. Canteen, late 1800s. Water serpents flank a turtle on this water carrier collected at Polacca, Arizona.
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4 Hopi. Stew bowls, 1895-1900. The bride's family prepares stew for the groom's family.
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4 Hopi. Stew bowls, 1895-1900. The bride's family prepares stew for the groom's family.
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4 Hopi. Stew bowls, 1895-1900. The bride's family prepares stew for the groom's family.
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4 Hopi. Stew bowls, 1895-1900. The bride's family prepares stew for the groom's family.
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4 Hopi. Stew bowls, 1895-1900. The bride's family prepares stew for the groom's family.
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10 Zuni. Canteen, c. 1900.
11 Zuni. Water Jar, c. 1900.
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10 Zuni. Canteen, c. 1900.
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10 Zuni. Canteen, c. 1900.
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11 Zuni. Water Jar, c. 1900.
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10 Zuni. Canteen, c. 1900.
11 Zuni. Water Jar, c. 1900.
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11 Zuni. Water Jar, c. 1900.
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11 Zuni. Water Jar, c. 1900.
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12 Zuni. Stew Bowl, c. 1900.
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11 Zuni. Water Jar, c. 1900.
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12 Zuni. Stew Bowl, c. 1900.
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13 Zuni. Jar, c. 1900.
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13 Zuni. Jar, c. 1900.
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14 Acoma. Storage Jar, 1920s. According to Delores Lewis Garcia, large jars traditionally stored oven bread and flour tortillas. Given the date when this jar was made, it was probably made for sale. Speaking in 2004, Garcia said that the jars this size are not made anymore. She noted the quantity of clay, slip and mineral pigments it takes to build a jar this large.
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14 Acoma. Storage Jar, 1920s. According to Delores Lewis Garcia, large jars traditionally stored oven bread and flour tortillas. Given the date when this jar was made, it was probably made for sale. Speaking in 2004, Garcia said that the jars this size are not made anymore. She noted the quantity of clay, slip and mineral pigments it takes to build a jar this large.
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14 Acoma. Storage Jar, 1920s. According to Delores Lewis Garcia, large jars traditionally stored oven bread and flour tortillas. Given the date when this jar was made, it was probably made for sale. Speaking in 2004, Garcia said that the jars this size are not made anymore. She noted the quantity of clay, slip and mineral pigments it takes to build a jar this large.
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14 Acoma. Storage Jar, 1920s. According to Delores Lewis Garcia, large jars traditionally stored oven bread and flour tortillas. Given the date when this jar was made, it was probably made for sale. Speaking in 2004, Garcia said that the jars this size are not made anymore. She noted the quantity of clay, slip and mineral pigments it takes to build a jar this large.
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7 Zuni. Corn meal bowl, c. 1900.
8 Zuni. Water Jar, late 1800s.
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7 Zuni. Corn meal bowl, c. 1900.
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8 Zuni. Water Jar, late 1800s.
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4 Zuni. Owl, late 1800s.
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6 Zuni. Canteen, c. 1900.
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6 Zuni. Canteen, c. 1900.
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6 Zuni. Canteen, c. 1900.
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9 Acoma. Jar, 1875-1925.
10 Laguna. Jar, c. 1900.
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9 Acoma. Jar, 1875-1925.
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9 Acoma. Jar, 1875-1925.
10 Laguna. Jar, c. 1900.
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10 Laguna. Jar, c. 1900.
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7 Acoma. Jar, 1885-1910. "One of the well-known characteristics of Acoma pottery in the thinness of the pottery, the very thins walls." Theresa Pasqual.
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7 Acoma. Jar, 1885-1910. "One of the well-known characteristics of Acoma pottery in the thinness of the pottery, the very thins walls." Theresa Pasqual.
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8 Acoma. Jar, c. 1890. "This type of jar inspired me so much. As a young girl, I remember seeing my mother and my aunts make pottery and the design that's on this particular piece is a parrot design. All the designs that are on this particular piece are related to Mother Nature. Everything that we put on our pottery comes from Mother Eart, and she's the one that provides all our materials." Dolores Lewis Garcia.
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8 Acoma. Jar, c. 1890. "This type of jar inspired me so much. As a young girl, I remember seeing my mother and my aunts make pottery and the design that's on this particular piece is a parrot design. All the designs that are on this particular piece are related to Mother Nature. Everything that we put on our pottery comes from Mother Eart, and she's the one that provides all our materials." Dolores Lewis Garcia.
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Santo Domingo. Bowl, early 1900s.
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Zia. Jar, c. 1885. This jar has a large parrot design that so often is seen combined with plant motifs on Zia pottery.
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6 Cochiti or Santo Domingo. Jar, early 1900s. This potter depicted animal life as well as Anglo-European life on a water jar.
7 Zia. Canteen, late 1800s. This shape was made before Europeans came to America. The back of the canteen is rarely decorated.
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6 Cochiti or Santo Domingo. Jar, early 1900s. This potter depicted animal life as well as Anglo-European life on a water jar.
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7 Zia. Canteen, late 1800s. This shape was made before Europeans came to America. The back of the canteen is rarely decorated.
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Cochiti. Figure, c. 1895.
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Cochiti. Figure, c. 1895.
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11 Santo Domingo. Jar, late 1800s. Large storage jars were all purpose containers for the home, storing such items as grain and bread.
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Cochiti. Bowl, c. 1880. The painter of this bowl found an impressive way to convey a sense of movement and energy in this design.
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Cochiti. Bowl, c. 1880. The painter of this bowl found an impressive way to convey a sense of movement and energy in this design.
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2 Tesque. Bowl, 1880-1900. This design that looks like and interlocking scroll was a popular and distinctive Tesque motif.
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1, 2 Zia?. Jars, ????
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3, 4 Zuni? (This label is for a dress not the jars.)
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1 A? Pueblo?
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2 A? Pueblo?
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3 A? Pueblo?
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4 Otowi Pueblo. San Lazaro glazed polychrome jar, c. AD 1490-1550. This jar comes form ancestral Tewa pueblo of the Rio Grande region.
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5 Ancestral Pueblo. Bandelier black-on-grey jar, c. AD 1500. This jar was made by people who were the ancestors of the Tewa-speaking people in New Mexico. In this design, Tewa advisor Gary Roybal sees triangular elements that represent mountains as well as trees and a trail along a stream which is represented by dots. This is a style Roybal associates with Otowi Pueblo.
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6 Ancestral Pueblo. Tularosa black-on-white canteen, AD 1100-1250. This canteen was meant to be seen from top and bottom. The potter flanked the spout with dog effigy handles and painted the figure of a person on the canteen base.
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7 Ancestral Pueblo. Tusayan polychrome bowl, AD 1250-1285. When this bowl was made, drought was causing people to move away form the more marginal farming areas and draw together in the center of the Kayenta region, where there was more water.
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8 Otowi Pueblo. Bandelier black-on-grey jar, c. AD 1500.
9 Ancestral Pueblo. Chaco black-on-white canteen, AD 1050-1150.
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9 Ancestral Pueblo. Chaco black-on-white canteen, AD 1050-1150.
10 Ancestral Pueblo. Red Mesa black-on-white pitcher, AD 870-950. The potter who made this pitcher painted a design that resembles a coiled snake and then placed pebbled in a pocket in the base to make the pitcher rattle.
11 Ancestral Pueblo. La Plata black-on-white bowl, AD 600-800. This circular design - perhaps a sun - was painted on other bowls from the La Plata Valley in New Mexico, just south of the Colorado state line. When this was made, people lived in pithouse groupings of from one to 12 houses on the mesa tops.
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12 Ancestral Pueblo. Exavada black-on-white pitcher, AD 925-1125. This effigy handle seems to depict a spotted cat crawling toward the rim for a drink.
13 Ancestral Pueblo. Cheque? polychrome jar, AD 1300-1400.
14 Ancestral Pueblo. Tusayan black-on-white dipper, AD 1150-1300. The dipper shape resemble a half gourd, which would have been the material dippers were made of before ceramics.
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1
2 ? Jeddis black-on-red bowl, AD1300-1450.
3 Otowi Pueblo. Tsankawi black-on-cream bowl, AD 1500-1600. Located on the Pajarito Plateau of New Mexico, Otowi was one of the larger communities of its time. According to advisor Gary Roybal, P??ye, Otowi and Tsankawi were ancestral Tewa communities that visited and traded with each other.
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20, 21 Ancestral Pueblo. Mesa Verde black-on-white mugs, AD 1200-1300. Mugs from the Mesa Verde area are a regional speciality. They are so standardized that archaeologists think there may have been just a few places where the pottery was produced.
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24 Ancestral Pueblo. Flagstaff black-on-white double jar, AD 1100-1200. The person who decorated this piece mad the design on one jar entirely different from the design on the other. Around the time when this piece was mad in the mid-1100s, abundant rainfall drew many people to the Flagstaff area, where they built masonry pueblo homes.
25 Ancestral Pueblo. Holbrook black-on-white bowl, c. AD 1075.
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1 Ancestral Pueblo. St. John's black-on-red jar, AD 1275-1325. This jar is fairly large and would have been rather heavy when full, so the potter made it easier to handle by placing indentations on the base on either side.
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3 Ancestral Pueblo. Snowflake black-on-white/Bitahochi-style bowl, c. AD 1300. This bowl was made at a time when many people were relocating their homes because of the Great Drought, which occurred from AD 1296-1299. As a result, potters may have gathered design and technical ideas from people with whom they had not previously been in contact. The body of the human figure on this piece is in the shape of an hourglass, a shape seen on some petroglyph figures from the Mesa Verde area.
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3 Ancestral Pueblo. Snowflake black-on-white/Bitahochi-style bowl, c. AD 1300. This bowl was made at a time when many people were relocating their homes because of the Great Drought, which occurred from AD 1296-1299. As a result, potters may have gathered design and technical ideas from people with whom they had not previously been in contact. The body of the human figure on this piece is in the shape of an hourglass, a shape seen on some petroglyph figures from the Mesa Verde area.
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Gift Shop Artefact - Super Fine Western Apache Basket, Winnowing Tray. c. 1900.
3 3/4" x 14" (9.5 x 35.6 cm)
15-16 Stitches to the inch
7-8 Coils to the inch
Simply one of the nicest examples we have seen in recent years. Large, open tray with central star motif, cloud and lightning motif. Smooth and even stitching, clean rim and a very sturdy basket. Willow and Devil's Claw weft on a 3-rod foundation. Excellent condition. Has one broken rim stitch, 2 damaged stitches near rim probably due to an old tag, 3 pinholes for stringing, and a small center hole which has no broken weaving material. all of these damages very very slight.
[160318-47]
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Gift Shop Artefact - Pomo Gift Basket
Feather basket with dangles. This basket is in very good condition. There is minor stitch loss and ethnographic wear. The coil count is 5 and the stitch count is 16, per inch. Acquired from a private collection out of Santa Fe.
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Gift Shop Artefact - Pomo Gift Basket
Feather basket with dangles. This basket is in very good condition. There is minor stitch loss and ethnographic wear. The coil count is 5 and the stitch count is 16, per inch. Acquired from a private collection out of Santa Fe.
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Gift Shop Artefacts - Baskets.
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Gift Shop Artefacts - Baskets.