Pottery - Casa Grande Monument and Heard Museum

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These pottery designs indicate the importance of animals in Hohokam life. Pictured on these ceramic framents are quail, lizards, and deer.
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Potsherds. Whole ceramic vessels are rare in archeological sites. Potsherds, the fragmentary remains of vessels, provide a wealth of information to archeologists. Designs on sherds can be used to date sites. The vessel part, such as the rim, body, or base, and vessel type, such as a bowl, jar, or plate, can be determined by studying potsherds. Temper often determines if the pottery was made locally or traded.
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Potsherds. Whole ceramic vessels are rare in archeological sites. Potsherds, the fragmentary remains of vessels, provide a wealth of information to archeologists. Designs on sherds can be used to date sites. The vessel part, such as the rim, body, or base, and vessel type, such as a bowl, jar, or plate, can be determined by studying potsherds. Temper often determines if the pottery was made locally or traded.
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Olla. Large pottery vessels were used for water and food storage and saguaro wine cooking. When different types of temper were added, a vessel became more porous and acted as an evaporative cooler, producing chilled water. This olla was found near the Great House.
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Olla. Large pottery vessels were used for water and food storage and saguaro wine cooking. When different types of temper were added, a vessel became more porous and acted as an evaporative cooler, producing chilled water. This olla was found near the Great House.
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Trade items found at Casa Grande Ruins.
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Tucson Polychrome jar fragment. Tucson Basin, Hohokam
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Tucson Polychrome jar fragment. Tucson Basin, Hohokam
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Gila Polychrome fragment. Tonto Basin, Salado.
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Deadmans Black-on-red pitcher. Ancestral Pueblo.
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Awatovi Black-on-yellow bowl fragment. Hopi Mesas.
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Pre-Classic period Carved bowl or censer.
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Human figurine: Paint on the figurine face suggests that the Hohokam may have painted or tattooed their bodies and faces.
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Basket. The Hohokam made baskets for gathering and transporting harvested palnts form the fields and also for processing, storking, and serving foods. Yucca, cattail, and beargrass were the primary resources for basket making.
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An artist's conception of Pre-Classic period Hohokam dancers. The decorative feather headdresses, necklaces, and costumes are based on pottery designs, clay figurines, and petroglyphs.
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This petroglyph cast shows a Desert Bighorn Sheep.
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This petroglyph cast shows a Desert Bighorn Sheep.

The Heard Museum

of Native Cultures and Art

Phoenix, Arizona
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Tony Jojola (b.1958), Isleta and Rosemary lonewolf (b. 1953), Santa Clara Tewa. "Indigenous Evolution," 2004 This art fence references the land of the South-west and the organic fences built by Native people from materials such as adobe, ocotillo or saguaro cactus. The fence harmonizes colors of the Southwest in clay and glass. The fence begins with darker colors, and then continues with brighter colors representing land and sky.
"The fence speaks to the endurance of our culture. It's about going through boundaries, it symbolizes our persistent existence.'" Tony Jojola.
"This linear installation reminds visitors to leave stereotyped preconceptions behind and enter a world where indigenous people blend the past with the present and firmly establish a limitless future." Rosemary Lonewolf.
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2 Camille Quotskuyva (b. 1964) Hopi-Tewa. Jar 1991.
Like other innovative potters, Camille Quotskuyva, Nampeyo's great-great-granddaughter, created her own version of the bird-wing motif.
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1, 2 Zia?. Jars, ????
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3, 4 Zuni? (This label is for a dress not the jars.)
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1 A? Pueblo?
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2 A? Pueblo?
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3 A? Pueblo?
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Gift Shop Artefact - Super Fine Western Apache Basket, Winnowing Tray. c. 1900.
3 3/4" x 14" (9.5 x 35.6 cm)
15-16 Stitches to the inch
7-8 Coils to the inch
Simply one of the nicest examples we have seen in recent years. Large, open tray with central star motif, cloud and lightning motif. Smooth and even stitching, clean rim and a very sturdy basket. Willow and Devil's Claw weft on a 3-rod foundation. Excellent condition. Has one broken rim stitch, 2 damaged stitches near rim probably due to an old tag, 3 pinholes for stringing, and a small center hole which has no broken weaving material. all of these damages very very slight.
[160318-47]
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Gift Shop Artefact - Pomo Gift Basket
Feather basket with dangles. This basket is in very good condition. There is minor stitch loss and ethnographic wear. The coil count is 5 and the stitch count is 16, per inch. Acquired from a private collection out of Santa Fe.
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Gift Shop Artefact - Pomo Gift Basket
Feather basket with dangles. This basket is in very good condition. There is minor stitch loss and ethnographic wear. The coil count is 5 and the stitch count is 16, per inch. Acquired from a private collection out of Santa Fe.
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Gift Shop Artefacts - Baskets.
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Gift Shop Artefacts - Baskets.